Community Members Cast Their Votes In Municipal Elections 

Municipal elections held for passing of propositions, taxes and candidates

Liberty+High+School+served+as+a+polling+center+for+local+voters.

Jayce Haun

Liberty High School served as a polling center for local voters.

Mollie Banstetter, Layout Editor

Community members took to the polls on Tuesday, April 5 to cast their ballots for the municipal elections, one specifically pertaining to Wentzville Board of Education candidates

Outside the small gym, many people stood in the morning, covered up in jackets and hats, warm cups of coffee in hand, welcoming in voters. 

Claudia Jenkins, a voter and supporter of BOE candidates Dr. Julie Scott and Mr. Donald Looney Jr., was just one of the people standing outside. Ms. Jenkins expressed what she’s looking for in a BOE member.

“The people that we vote in to make decisions for our kids in the district and staff in our district, we need to make sure that their values align with what we value and that their interest really is what’s best for the students and what’s best for the staff,” Jenkins said. “I’m very passionate about special education. I’m passionate about restraint and seclusion policies, and I’m passionate about making sure that all of our kids are getting the best education that they can get. That all the teachers and kids here feel supported.”

This election, the municipal election, this April affects your pocketbook. It’s when your propositions, taxes and the board members are voted on. They need to realize that’s actually more important than a congressman or senator.”

— Cheryl Rowland, local voter

Once voters entered the small gym where the polling takes place, community members walked by many signs hung up on the walls; posters of Missouri’s voter information, the Missouri Voters Bill of Rights, and sample copies of the ballot voters received. Inside the gym there are many polling booths spread out, as well as poll workers sitting at desks with their computers and documents neatly organized. 

Poll supervisor Cheryl Rowland revealed that only about 10% of the total local population participates in municipal elections. Rowland urges more community members to get out and vote.

“This election, the municipal election, this April affects your pocketbook. It’s when your propositions, taxes and the board members are voted on. They need to realize that’s actually more important than a congressman or senator.” 

After voting, a community member who wishes to remain anonymous, shared how they went about researching the candidates on this year’s ballot.

“I emailed each of the school board candidates and as far as the propositions I went online and Googled it to see what they were. I got a reply from most of the candidates and some of them even called and spoke to me.”

For many students, this was their first opportunity to vote as it was for senior Athena Widlacki. Widlacki learned about the BOE candidates through the Town Hall put on by Liberty Publications.

“I listened to the town hall and considered all the candidate’s points of view before making my decision.” 

Although Widlacki will be leaving for college soon, resulting in her personally being unaffected by Wentzville’s BOE, she still found it important for her vote to be counted. “Even though I am leaving, this is my community with amazing people and I think they deserve the best people to represent them.” 

While the polls opened at 6 a.m. registered voters have until 7 p.m. to cast their ballots. Results are expected to be in by approximately 10:30 p.m., April 5.