Diversity Club Presents Coco

Diversity Club hosts the showing of the movie Coco in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month.

%28From+left+to+right%29+Diversity+Club+sponsor+Ms.+Borders%2C+Club+president+junior+Tai+Williams%2C+freshman+Karlie+Wooten+and+freshman+Le%27Shay+Watkins.
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Diversity Club Presents Coco

(From left to right) Diversity Club sponsor Ms. Borders, Club president junior Tai Williams, freshman Karlie Wooten and freshman Le'Shay Watkins.

(From left to right) Diversity Club sponsor Ms. Borders, Club president junior Tai Williams, freshman Karlie Wooten and freshman Le'Shay Watkins.

Amour Riley

(From left to right) Diversity Club sponsor Ms. Borders, Club president junior Tai Williams, freshman Karlie Wooten and freshman Le'Shay Watkins.

Amour Riley

Amour Riley

(From left to right) Diversity Club sponsor Ms. Borders, Club president junior Tai Williams, freshman Karlie Wooten and freshman Le'Shay Watkins.

Amour Riley, Reporter

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Diversity Club members joined together to learn more about the Hispanic culture through a fun colorful animated film on Monday, Oct. 29 and watch the popular Disney movie “Coco”.

The group was recognizing Hispanic Heritage Month. The point of watching the movie was to learn more of the Hispanic culture. They watched it to get a brief understanding while enjoying themselves with friends and family. The movie wasn’t just for Diversity Club itself as they were encouraged to invite friends and family members to enjoy the experience with us and take some message from the movie.

“Coco” is a movie based around a boy named Miguel’s dreams of becoming a musician despite his family’s ban on music. In order to get a blessing to play music, he enters the land of the dead. After meeting a man named Hector, he embarks a journey to find out the real story of his family’s history.

“I loved the movie because it had lots of beautiful colors, decorations and music,” freshman Le’Shay Watkins, a member of the Diversity Club said. “I loved how it showcased the Hispanic culture in ways all ages could understand. In my opinion, I think it was a great movie.”

Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a holiday mainly celebrated in cities and towns in Mexico, from Oct. 31-Nov. 2. Day of The Dead is a widely respected holiday and honored amongst many in the Hispanic community.

Day of the Dead was founded several thousand years ago by the Aztec, Toltec and Nahua people. The two-day celebration remembers deceased loved ones and honors their memory instead of mourning them you congratulate them moving on and you celebrate their life and memory.

“Day of the dead is awesome,” Diversity Club member sophomore Robert Smith said. “It’s like you celebrate your loved ones that passed away like they are right there with you.”

Another person who came to the movie showing but is not part of the Diversity Club, freshman Karlie Wooten shared, “I love the idea of the Day of the Dead because it gives family members a chance to celebrate the lives of their loved ones that passed away.”

During Day of the Dead, families have an alter, or ofrenda, which you can think of as like the centerpiece of the celebration. They’re mainly built in private homes or cemeteries, filled with offerings to welcome the spirits back to the living world. Offerings include things like food and drinks. If it was a child that passed, theirs might be toys. There are pictures with a candlestick for every dead relative.